Michigan English Test (MET)

The Michigan English Test (MET) is a standardized high-beginner to low-advanced English as a foreign language (EFL) examination. The Michigan English Test (MET) is used to measure general English language proficiency in social, educational, and workplace contexts, and is recognized as official documentary evidence of English ability in several countries around the world.



MET Test




MET test
Who is it for?
The MET exam technically assesses English proficiency over a number of levels (ranging from upper beginner to lower advanced), in practice it is intended for candidates with a secondary level of education who want to certify their general English language proficiency in social, educational, and workplace contexts. Accordingly, while the MET test (Michigan English Test) is frequently used by applicants for English immersion schools and by those applying for a job that requires a working knowledge of the English language.
MET test
Why should you take the MET exam?
While the MET test is calibrated to certify applicants with English speaking abilities as diverse as A2 to C1 on the Common European Framework of Reference, in practice it emphasizes the intermediate level – B1 and B2 – levels of proficiency. The MET exam uses the conventions of American English. This means that the spelling, grammar, and pronunciation used throughout the exam will be of the American English style, resulting in a clear advantage for candidates who have studied and/or plan to use English in the United States.

Test Format


Section Time Description
Writing 45 minutes The writing test has two tasks:
Task 1 : test takers are presented with three questions on a related theme. Test takers respond to each question with a series of sentences that connect ideas together.
Task 2: test takers are presented with a single prompt. Test takers respond by producing a short essay.
Reading 90 minutes Grammar section (25 questions) followed by Reading section (50 questions). Multiple-choice questions with four options.
Grammar section :
tests takers read 1 to 2 sentences from which a word or phrase has been removed. Test takers are asked to complete the sentence by selecting the most appropriate word or phrase from four options.

Reading section:
each set of reading items is followed by 12 to 14 multiple-choice questions. One of two questions test comprehension across more than one reading section.
Listening 45 minutes Part 1 (multiple choice)
Test takers hear a short conversation between two people. After each conversation, the test taker answers a question about it.
Part 2 (multiple choice)
Test takers hear a longer conversation between two people. After each conversation, the test taker answers some questions about it.
Part 3 (multiple choice)
Test takers hear some short talks. After each talk, the test taker answers some questions about it.
Speaking 10 minutes A structured one-on-one interaction between an examiner and a test taker.